Political Uses of the Past: Public Memory of Slavery and Colonialism

Práticas da História: Journal on Theory, Historiography and Uses of the Past

Editors:

Ana Lucia Araujo, Howard University, United States

Ynaê Lopes dos Santos, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brazil

Over the past thirty years, debates around the transatlantic slavery past and the European colonization of Africa and the Americas have found fertile ground in the public space of the United States, Brazil, France, Portugal, Netherlands, Belgium, Spain, South Africa, Senegal, Nigeria, and Republic of Benin (Chivallon 2005, Chivallon 2012, Araujo 2014, Hourcade 2014, Fleming 2017, Moody 2020, Mattos 2020, Pachá e Krause 2020, Arantes, Farias e Santos, 2021). Since 2013, with the rise of the #BlackLivesMatter movement in the United States, and in 2015 with the Rhodes Must Fall movement in South Africa and England (Kwoba, Chantiluke, Nkopo, 2018) these debates have become even more heated and have spread far beyond North America. While activists and citizens racialized as blacks (Otele, 2020) call for the overthrow of monuments honoring white supremacists or statues commemorating individuals who defended slavery and racial segregation (Domby, 2020, Cox 2021). Meanwhile, individuals racialized as whites also have organized themselves to defend the symbols of slavery and the colonial past in the Americas, mainly in the United States, and in Europe (Araujo 2020).

After the assassination of George Floyd in 2020, these movements spread to several European and even African countries, where men and women called for the overthrow or took down with their own hands statues of white men who defended African and indigenous slavery (Thompson 2022), slave traders such as Robert E. Lee (Cox 2021), Edward Colston, Robert Milligan (Araujo 2020), James McGill and Borba Gato (Arantes, Farias and Santos, 2021). Black, white, and indigenous protesters also attacked the monuments honoring the founding fathers of the United States who owned slaves such as George Washington and Thomas Jefferson and even other figures, until then almost untouched, who were symbols of European colonialism such as Cecil Rhodes, Winston Churchill (Elkins 2022) and Christopher Columbus (Thompson 2022).

In addition to the removal of monuments, other debates emerged in the public sphere and increasingly provocative actions took place in the public space. During a period of polarization that emerged with Donald Trump’s election in the United States, the commemoration of the symbolic date 1619, which marked the arrival of the first documented enslaved Africans in the colony of Virginia, sparked a wave of commemorations and was also marked by the publication of the 1619 Project, a journalistic supplement to the New York Times Magazine (recently published as a book) aiming to recontextualize the history of the United States by refocusing slavery and the contribution of African Americans as core dimensions of the country’s history (Hannah-Jones 2021). Shortly after the publication of the supplement, some academics criticized the project for factual errors and for putting “ideology” above historical understanding. With the support of the New York Times, the 1619 Project had a wide dissemination in the media, while its founders started to promote the distribution of the supplement and its introduction in the school curriculum of American schools, where teachers started to use it to teach the history of slavery history, racial inequalities and the history of mass incarceration that disproportionally affects the country’s black population. In response to the project, a group of right-wing white scholars launched the 1776 Project  with the aim of promoting ideals of “patriotism and pride in American history” and with the aim of attacking 1619 Project and also what they termed the “critical race theory,” a broad intellectual movement that emerged in the 1960s, emphasizing among others that the idea of race is a historical construct and that racism is a product of legal and political systems.

Despite the specific nuances, similar debates have been taking place in other countries in the Americas, especially in Brazil with pseudo-movements such as the “school without a party”, where even the concept of slavery has been questioned. But there is also a historical and visible movement to recognize the legacy of the slavery past, which was especially evident with the inscription of the Valongo Wharf as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO, a long process that involved a broad public debate within different social groups. The debates about the sites associated with the memory of slavery also gained new visibility in the city of Salvador (Silva Jr. 2021), through the Salvador escravista project (www.salvadorescravista.com) and in the Paraíba Valley through the project Passados Presentes (http://passadospresentes.com.br/). Such issues are also finding resonance in other spheres. For example, a growing number of readers are interested in black men and women authors and in works that debate the racial issue in Brazil (a new editorial niche in the country).

In Europe, the battles of the public memory of slavery and colonization have also become increasingly visible in the public space as well (Elkins 2022). On the one hand, these debates not only address the removal of pro-slavery monuments, but also manifest themselves in the teaching of the history of slavery and racism (Araújo and Rodríguez Maeso 2016). On the other hand, while several North American and European museums have increasingly addressed the history of slavery (Araujo 2021), the role of these museums has been increasingly questioned, as their collections house thousands of objects looted during the wars of conquest of the African continent and during the period of European colonialism in Africa (Beaujean 2019, Hicks 2020). Several African nations such as the Republic of Benin, Senegal and Nigeria have made official requests for the repatriation of looted objects. In some cases, such requests for the restitution of African heritage have had some success. In November 2021, France returned to the Republic of Benin 26 treasures stolen by colonial troops during the conquest of Dahomey. Although these objects correspond to only a tiny part of the looted artifacts (Silva Jr. 2021), this case is an example of the possible success of such requests for repatriation.

These debates show that we are living in a unique moment, in which the intersection between memory, the past of slavery and colonialism, and racial inequalities is increasingly visible.

Aiming to link the debates on the public memory of slavery and colonialism from a transnational and comparative perspective, this issue of the journal Práticas da História aims to explore the following themes:

– History and public memory of slavery

– Construction and fall of pro-slavery and colonial monuments

– History and representations of slavery and colonialism in school textbooks

– Slavery and colonialism in the museum

– Reclaiming the history and memory of. slavery in initiatives such as the 1619 Project, Salvador Escravista, Passados Presentes and others.

Proposals for articles (500 words) in Portuguese, English, French and Spanish, with specific case studies, are particularly welcome.

Send your abstract no later than February 15, 2022, to Professor Ana Lucia Araujo at aaraujo@howard.edu

Deadline for submission of articles from selected proposals: June 30, 2022

References:

Araujo, Ana Lucia. Museums and Atlantic Slavery. New York: Routledge, 2021.

Araujo, Ana Lucia. Slavery in the Age of Memory: Engaging the Past. London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2020.

Araujo, Ana Lucia. Shadows of the Slave Past: Memory, Heritage, and Slavery. New York: New York, 2014.

Araújo, Marta and Silvia Rodríguez Maeso. Os contornos do eurocentrism, raça, história e texto políticos. Coimbra: Almedina, 2016.

Arantes, Erika B., Juliana Barreto Farias and Ynaê Lopes dos Santos. “Dossiê: Racismo em pauta: A história que a história não conta.” Revista brasileira de história 41, no. 88 (2021): 15-32.

Barreiros, Inês Beleza. “Os murais do Salão Nobre: Documento do colonialismo ou o colonialismo (ainda hoje) em acção?” O Público, October 21, 2021, https://www.publico.pt/2021/10/21/opiniao/opiniao/murais-salao-nobre-documento-colonialismo-colonialismo-hoje-accao-1982038.

Beaujean, Gaëlle. L’art de la cour d’Abomey : Le sens des objets. Paris : Presses du Réel, 2019.

Chivallon, Christine. “L’émergence récente de la mémoire de l’esclavage dans l’espace public : Enjeux et significations.” Revue d’histoire moderne et contemporaine, no. 52-4 (2005) : 64-81.

Chivallon, Christine. L’esclavage, du souvenir à la mémoire : Contribution à une anthropologie de la Caraïbe. Paris: Karthala, 2012.

Cox, Karen. No Common Ground: Confederate Monuments and the Ongoing Fight for Racial Justice. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2021.

Domby, Adam H. The False Cause: Fraud, Fabrication, and White Supremacy in Confederate Memory. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2020.

Elkins, Caroline. Legacy of Violence: A History of the British Empire. New York: Knopf, 2022.

Fleming, Crystal Marie. Resurrecting Slavery: Racial Legacies and White Supremacy in France. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2017.

Hanna-Jones, Nikole. The 1619 Project: A New Origin Story. New York: One World, 2021.

Hicks, Dan. The Brutish Museums: The Benin Bronzes, Colonial Violence, and Cultural Restitution. London : Pluto Press, 2020.

Hourcade, Renaud. Les ports négriers face à leur histoire : Politiques de la mémoire à Nantes, Bordeaux et Liverpool. Paris: Daloz, 2014.

Roseanne Chantiluke, Brian Kwoba, and Athniangamso Nkopo. Rhodes Must Fall: The Struggle to Decolonise the Racist Heart of Empire, ed. London: Zed Books, 2018.

Mattos, Hebe. “O que documenta um monumento?” Conversa de historiadoras, June 21, 2020, https://conversadehistoriadoras.com/2020/06/21/o-que-documenta-um-monumento

Moody, Jessica. The Persistence of Memory: Remembering Slavery in Liverpool ‘Slaving Capital of the World’. Liverpool University Press: Liverpool, 2020.

Otele, Olivette. African Europeans: An Untold Story. London: Hurst, 2020.

Pachá, Paulo and Thiago Krause. “Derrubando estátuas, fazendo história.” O Globo, June 19, 2020, https://oglobo.globo.com/epoca/cultura/artigo-derrubando-estatuas-fazendo-historia-24487372 

Silva Jr., Carlos. “Monumentos e as memórias da escravidão no Brasil Contemporâneo.” Portal Geledés, August 11, 2021, https://www.geledes.org.br/monumentos-e-as-memorias-da-escravidao-no-brasil-contemporaneo/

Silva Jr. Carlos. “Ômicron desperta olhar colonialista e faz Brasil esquecer elos com a África.” UOL Notícias, December 1, 2021, https://noticias.uol.com.br/opiniao/coluna/2021/12/01/omicron-desperta-olhar-colonialista-e-faz-brasil-esquecer-elos-com-a-africa.htm

Thompson, Erin. The Rise and Fall of America’s Public Monuments. New York: W. W. Norton, 2022.

CHAMADA DE ARTIGOS

Práticas da História: Journal on Theory, Historiography and Uses of the Past

Usos políticos do passado: memória pública da escravidão e do colonialismo

Ana Lucia Araujo, Howard University, Estados Unidos

Ynaê Lopes dos Santos, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brasil

Nos últimos trinta anos, os debates em torno do passado escravista transatlântico e da colonização europeia da África e das Américas têm encontrado um terreno fértil no espaço público dos Estados Unidos da América, Brasil, França, Portugal, Holanda, Bélgica, Espanha, África do Sul, Senegal, Nigéria e República do Benim (Chivallon 2005, Chivallon 2012, Araujo 2014, Hourcade 2014, Fleming 2017, Moody 2020, Mattos 2020, Pachá e Krause 2020, Arantes, Farias e Santos 2021, Barreiros 2021). Desde 2013, com a ascensão do movimento #BlackLivesMatter nos Estados Unidos, e em 2015 com o movimento Rhodes Must Fall na África do Sul e na Inglaterra (Kwoba, Chantiluke, Nkopo, 2018), esses debates têm se acirrado ainda mais e se propagaram bem além da América do Norte. Se de um lado, ativistas e cidadãos racializados como negros (Otele, 2020) pedem a derru,bada de monumentos homenageando supremacistas brancos ou estátuas comemorando indivíduos que defenderam a escravidão e a segregação racial (Domby, 2020, Cox 2021), indivíduos racializados como brancos também têm se organizado para defender os símbolos do passado escravista e colonial seja nas Américas, principalmente nos Estados Unidos ou na Europa (Araujo 2020).

Depois do assassinato de George Floyd em 2020, esses movimentos se espalharam por vários países europeus e, inclusive, africanos, onde homens e mulheres pediram a derrubada ou derrubaram com suas próprias mãos estátuas de homens brancos que defenderam a escravidão africana e indígena (Thompson 2022), traficantes de escravos como Robert E. Lee (Cox 2021), Edward Colston, Robert Milligan (Araujo 2020), James McGill e Borba Gato (Arantes, Farias e Santos, 2021). Manifestantes negros, brancos e indígenas também atacaram os monumentos homenageando os pais fundadores dos Estados Unidos que eram proprietários de escravos como George Washington e Thomas Jefferson e mesmo outras figuras, até então quase intocadas, que foram símbolos do colonialismo europeu como Cecil Rhodes, Winston Churchill (Elkins 2022) e Cristóvão Colombo (Thompson 2022).

Além da derrubada dos monumentos, a esfera pública foi tomada de outros debates e ações cada vez mais instigantes. Durante um período de polarização que emergiu com a eleição de Donald Trump nos Estados Unidos, a comemoração da data simbólica 1619, que marcou a chegada dos primeiros africanos escravizados (devidamente documentada) na colônia da Virgínia suscitou uma onda de comemorações e também foi marcada pela publicação do Projeto 1619, um suplemento jornalístico do New York Times Magazine (recentemente publicado sob forma de um livro) visando recontextualizar a história dos Estados Unidos recentrando a escravidão e a contribuição dos Afro-Americanos como dimensão medular da história dos Estados Unidos (Hannah-Jones 2021). Logo após a publicação do suplemento alguns acadêmicos criticaram o projeto por erros factuais e por colocar “ideologia acima da compreensão histórica.” Com o apoio do New York Times, o Projeto 1619 teve uma ampla repercussão na mídia e seus idealizadores passaram a promover a distribuição do suplemento e sua introdução no currículo escolar das escolas estadunidenses, onde professores passaram a usá-lo para ensinar história da escravidão, das desigualdades raciais e a história do encarceramento em massa que atinge principalmente a população negra do país. Um outro grupo de acadêmicos brancos identificados com movimentos de direita lançou o Projeto 1776 com o intuito de promover ideais de “patriotismo e orgulho da história americana” e com o objetivo de atacar o Projeto 1619 e o que eles designaram como “teoria crítica da raça,” um amplo movimento intelectual que surgiu nos anos 1960 e que enfatiza que o ideia de raça é uma construção histórica, que o racismo é produto de sistemas legais e políticos.

Apesar das nuances específicas, debates similares têm se produzido em outros países das Américas, principalmente no Brasil com pseudomovimentos como o da “escola sem partido”, nos quais até mesmo o conceito de escravidão vem sendo questionado.  Mas também se observa um movimento histórico e notório em reconhecer as heranças do passado escravista, o que ficou especialmente evidenciado com e eleição do Cais do Valongo como Patrimônio da Humanidade pela UNESCO, um processo longo, que envolveu um amplo debate público de diferentes setores sociais. A revisitação aos lugares de memória da escravidão também ganhou novo tônus na cidade de Salvador (Silva Jr. 2021), com o projeto Salvador escravista (www.salvadorescravista.com). Tais questões encontram ressonância no crescimento do interesse do público leitor por autores negros e negras e por obras que debatam a questão racial no Brasil (um novo nicho editorial do país).

Na Europa, as batalhas da memória pública da escravidão e da colonização também têm ficado cada vez mais visíveis no espaço público (Elkins 2022). De um lado, esses debates se dão não somente em relação às remoções dos monumentos pro-escravocratas, mas também se manifestam no ensino da história da escravidão e do racismo (Araújo e Maeso 2016). De outro lado, enquanto vários museus norte-americanos e europeus tem abordado cada vez mais da história da escravidão (Araujo 2021), o papel desses museus tem sido tem cada vez mais sido questionado, pois suas coleções abrigam milhares de objetos saqueados durante as guerras de conquista do continente africano e durante o período do colonialismo europeu na África (Beaujean 2019, Hicks 2020). Várias nações africanas como a República do Benim, o Senegal e a Nigéria fizeram pedidos oficiais de repatriação dos objetos saqueados. Em alguns casos tais pedidos de restituição do patrimônio africano tem tido um certo sucesso. Em novembro de 2021, a França devolveu à República do Benim, 26 tesouros roubados pelas tropas coloniais durante a conquista do Daomé. Embora esses objetos correspondam apenas a uma ínfima parte dos artefatos saqueados, esse caso é um exemplo do possível sucesso de tais pedidos de repatriação.

Observa-se então que vivemos num momento ímpar, no qual a intersecção entre memória, passado escravista e colonialista e desigualdades raciais antes latente se torna cada vez mais visível.

Visando associar os debates da memória pública da escravidão e do colonialismo a partir de uma perspectiva transnacional e comparada, esse número da revista Práticas da História visa explorar os seguintes temas:

– História e memória pública da escravidão

– Construção e queda dos monumentos pro-escravocratas e coloniais

– História e representações da escravidão e do colonialismo nos manuais escolares

– Escravidão e colonialismo no museu

– Recuperando a história e a memória da escravidão em initiativas como construção de memória como o 1619 Project, Salvador Escravista, Passados Presentes e outros.

Propostas de artigos (500 palavras) em português, inglês, francês e espanhol, com estudos de caso específicos são particularmente bem-vindas.

Envie seu resumo até 15 de fevereiro de 2022 para Professora Ana Lucia Araujo, aaraujo@howard.edu

Data limite para submissão de artigos a partir das propostas selecionadas: 30 de junho de 2022

Referências

Araujo, Ana Lucia. Museums and Atlantic Slavery. New York: Routledge, 2021.

Araujo, Ana Lucia. Slavery in the Age of Memory: Engaging the Past. London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2020.

Araujo, Ana Lucia. Shadows of the Slave Past: Memory, Heritage, and Slavery. New York: New York, 2014.

Araújo, Marta and Silvia Rodríguez Maeso. Os contornos do eurocentrism, raça, história e texto políticos. Coimbra: Almedina, 2016.

Arantes, Erika B., Juliana Barreto Farias e Ynaê Lopes dos Santos. “Dossiê: Racismo em pauta: A história que a história não conta.” Revista brasileira de história 41, no. 88 (2021): 15-32.

Barreiros, Inês Beleza. “Os murais do Salão Nobre: Documento do colonialismo ou o colonialismo (ainda hoje) em acção?” O Público, 21 de outubro de 2021, https://www.publico.pt/2021/10/21/opiniao/opiniao/murais-salao-nobre-documento-colonialismo-colonialismo-hoje-accao-1982038

Beaujean, Gaëlle. L’art de la cour d’Abomey : Le sens des objets. Paris : Presses du Réel, 2019.

Chivallon, Christine. “L’émergence récente de la mémoire de l’esclavage dans l’espace public : Enjeux et significations.” Revue d’histoire moderne et contemporaine, no. 52-4 (2005) : 64-81.

Chivallon, Christine. L’esclavage, du souvenir à la mémoire : Contribution à une anthropologie de la Caraïbe, Karthala, Paris, 2012.

Cox, Karen. No Common Ground: Confederate Monuments and the Ongoing Fight for Racial Justice. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2021.

Domby, Adam H. The False Cause: Fraud, Fabrication, and White Supremacy in Confederate Memory. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2020.

Elkins, Caroline. Legacy of Violence: A History of the British Empire. New York: Knopf, 2022.

Fleming, Crystal Marie. Resurrecting Slavery: Racial Legacies and White Supremacy in France, Temple University Press, Philadelphia, 2017.

Hanna-Jones, Nikole. The 1619 Project: A New Origin Story. New York: One World, 2021.

Hicks, Dan. The Brutish Museums: The Benin Bronzes, Colonial Violence, and Cultural Restitution, Pluto Press, London, 2020.

Hourcade, Renaud. Les ports négriers face à leur histoire : Politiques de la mémoire à Nantes, Bordeaux et Liverpool, Daloz, Paris, 2014.

Roseanne Chantiluke, Brian Kwoba, e Athniangamso Nkopo, Rhodes Must Fall: The Struggle to Decolonise the Racist Heart of Empire, org. London, Zed Books, 2018.

Mattos, Hebe. “O que documenta um monumento?”, Conversa de historiadoras, 21 de junho de 2020, https://conversadehistoriadoras.com/2020/06/21/o-que-documenta-um-monumento

Moody, Jessica. The Persistence of Memory: Remembering Slavery in Liverpool ‘Slaving Capital of the World’, Liverpool University Press, Liverpool, 2020.

Otele, Olivette. African Europeans: An Untold Story, Hurst, London, 2020.

Pachá, Paulo e Thiago Krause. “Derrubando estátuas, fazendo história, O Globo, 19 junho de 2020, https://oglobo.globo.com/epoca/cultura/artigo-derrubando-estatuas-fazendo-historia-24487372  

Silva Jr., Carlos. “Monumentos e as memórias da escravidão no Brasil Contemporâneo,” 11 de agosto de 2021, Portal Geledés, https://www.geledes.org.br/monumentos-e-as-memorias-da-escravidao-no-brasil-contemporaneo/

Silva Jr. Carlos. “Ômicron desperta olhar colonialista e faz Brasil esquecer elos com a África.” UOL Notícias, 1o de dezembro de 2021, https://noticias.uol.com.br/opiniao/coluna/2021/12/01/omicron-desperta-olhar-colonialista-e-faz-brasil-esquecer-elos-com-a-africa.htm

Thompson, Erin. The Rise and Fall of America’s Public Monuments. New York: W. W. Norton, 2022.